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(disaster OR disasters) AND ("public health" OR "health care" OR "emergency care" OR trauma OR "medical care" OR "health planning" OR "health education" OR "health information" OR "health literacy")

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2801. Global climate changes, natural disasters, and travel health risks. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Global climate changes, natural disasters, and travel health risks. Whether the result of cyclical atmospheric changes, anthropogenic activities, or combinations of both, authorities now agree that the earth is warming from a variety of climatic effects, including the cascading effects of greenhouse gas emissions to support human activities. To date, most reports of the public health outcomes of global warming have been anecdotal and retrospective in design and have focused on heat stroke (...) and human health outcomes have been identified and may be used as criteria to judge the causality of associations between the human health outcomes of climate changes and climate-driven natural disasters. Travel medicine physicians are obligated to educate their patients about the known public health outcomes of climate changes, about the disease and injury risk factors their patients may face from climate-spawned natural disasters, and about the best preventive measures to reduce infectious diseases

2006 Journal of Travel Medicine

2802. Mitigating the health impacts of a natural disaster--the June 2007 long-weekend storm in the Hunter region of New South Wales. (Abstract)

Mitigating the health impacts of a natural disaster--the June 2007 long-weekend storm in the Hunter region of New South Wales. A severe storm that began on Thursday, 7 June 2007 brought heavy rains and gale-force winds to Newcastle, Gosford, Wyong, Sydney, and the Hunter Valley region of New South Wales. The storm caused widespread flooding and damage to houses, businesses, schools and health care facilities, and damaged critical infrastructure. Ten people died as a result of the storm (...) , and approximately 6000 residents were evacuated. A natural disaster was declared in 19 local government areas, with damage expected to reach $1.5 billion. Additional demands were made on clinical health services, and interruption of the electricity supply to over 200,000 homes and businesses, interruption of water and gas supplies, and sewerage system pump failures presented substantial public health threats. A public health emergency operations centre was established by the Hunter New England Area Health

2007 Medical Journal of Australia

2803. Predictors of fatigue in rescue workers and residents in the aftermath of an aviation disaster: a longitudinal study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Predictors of fatigue in rescue workers and residents in the aftermath of an aviation disaster: a longitudinal study. Although medically unexplained physical symptoms such as fatigue are frequently observed after exposure to trauma, the vast majority of health outcomes studies in trauma and disaster research relates to the psychological and psychiatric problems met by victims. The objectives of this study were to investigate the prevalence of (persistent) fatigue in the aftermath of a disaster (...) and to analyze the predictive value of sociodemographic and various health-related variables for fatigue among both rescue workers and residents.A total of 1951 rescue workers and 753 residents involved in the Bijlmermeer aviation disaster participated in this study. Follow-up data were gathered in 70% of randomly selected rescue workers and 53% of the residents. Multiple regression analyses, multivariate logistic regression analyses, and crosslagged panel analyses examined sociodemographic variables

2006 Psychosomatic Medicine

2804. The extent and impact of mental health problems after disaster. (Abstract)

a public health approach to mental health that better serves the needs of the individual and the affected community. Such an approach considers all available human resources and is intended to mitigate the effects of disaster before serious psychopathologic sequelae arise. This community mental health strategy allows peripheral mental health workers to mediate between survivors and specialized mental health professionals while assisting in removing barriers to treatment. To be effective when disaster (...) The extent and impact of mental health problems after disaster. Disasters are events that challenge the individual's ability to adapt, which carries the risk of adverse mental health outcomes including serious posttraumatic psychopathologies. While risk is related to degree of exposure to psychological toxins, the unique vulnerabilities of special populations within the affected community as well as secondary stressors play an important role in determining the nature and amount of morbidity

2006 Journal of Clinical Psychiatry

2805. Symptomatology and psychopathology of mental health problems after disaster. (Abstract)

Symptomatology and psychopathology of mental health problems after disaster. A variety of reactions are observed after a major trauma. In the majority of cases these resolve without any long-term consequences. In a significant proportion of individuals, however, recovery may be impaired, leading to long-term pathological disturbances. The most common of these is post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), which is characterized by symptoms of reexperiencing the trauma, avoidance and numbing (...) , and hyperarousal. A range of other disorders may also be seen after trauma, and there is considerable overlap between PTSD symptoms and several other psychiatric conditions. Risk factors for PTSD include severe exposure to the trauma, female sex, low socioeconomic status, and a history of psychiatric illness. Although PTSD may resolve in the majority of cases, in some cases risk factors outweigh protective factors, and symptoms may persist for many years. PTSD often coexists with other psychiatric disorders

2006 Journal of Clinical Psychiatry

2806. Practical assessment and evaluation of mental health problems following a mass disaster. (Abstract)

Practical assessment and evaluation of mental health problems following a mass disaster. Almost all individuals who experience a severe trauma will develop symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) shortly after the traumatic event. Although the natural history of PTSD varies according to the type of trauma, most people do not develop enduring PTSD, and, in many of those who do, it resolves within 1 year without treatment. To the extent that is possible, maintenance of normal daily (...) activities is believed to help patients cope more successfully in the aftermath of major trauma. In the case of a disaster such as the Asian tsunami, the whole community is involved, and it is impossible to continue with normal daily activities. To improve overall outcome after trauma, it would be optimal to identify individuals at increased risk for developing PTSD. This article describes screening and assessment tools for posttrauma mental health problems, particularly PTSD, and examines in more detail

2006 Journal of Clinical Psychiatry

2807. Kidney patient care in disasters: lessons from the hurricanes and earthquake of 2005. Full Text available with Trip Pro

recommendations for patients, dialysis facilities, and providers, with a goal to improve care of kidney patients in future domestic disasters. With suitable planning, the nephrology community can do much to ensure the continuity of medical care for kidney patients in the face of a wide range of possible natural and human-made disasters. (...) Kidney patient care in disasters: lessons from the hurricanes and earthquake of 2005. The active 2005 hurricane season alerted Americans to the pressing need for a more effective response to mass casualty incidents. The kidney patient community was particularly affected. Ninety-four dialysis facilities in the Gulf Coast states closed for at least 1 wk in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, and additional units were affected by evacuation of dialysis patients. Dialysis units along the Gulf Coast

2007 Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology

2808. Unforeseen difficulties faced by a hospital in dealing with mass disaster victims. (Abstract)

Unforeseen difficulties faced by a hospital in dealing with mass disaster victims. Every major mass disaster challenges the health care services, especially in the third world. These challenges include the expected situations mainly pertaining to the overload of patients and the stretching of hospital facilities. We report our experiences about several unforseen challenges faced by our hospital in the 2005 earthquake that struck the Kashmir region.

2008 Tropical Doctor

2809. Disaster planning for schools. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Disaster planning for schools. Community awareness of the school district's disaster plan will optimize a community's capacity to maintain the safety of its school-aged population in the event of a school-based or greater community crisis. This statement is intended to stimulate awareness of the disaster-preparedness process in schools as a part of a global, community-wide preparedness plan. Pediatricians, other health care professionals, first responders, public health officials, the media (...) , school nurses, school staff, and parents all need to be unified in their efforts to support schools in the prevention of, preparedness for, response to, and recovery from a disaster.

2008 Pediatrics

2810. Definitive care for the critically ill during a disaster: medical resources for surge capacity: from a Task Force for Mass Critical Care summit meeting, January 26-27, 2007, Chicago, IL. (Abstract)

Definitive care for the critically ill during a disaster: medical resources for surge capacity: from a Task Force for Mass Critical Care summit meeting, January 26-27, 2007, Chicago, IL. Mass numbers of critically ill disaster victims will stress the abilities of health-care systems to maintain usual critical care services for all in need. To enhance the number of patients who can receive life-sustaining interventions, the Task Force on Mass Critical Care (hereafter termed the Task Force) has (...) and large procedure suites, (B) telemetry units, and (C) hospital wards; and (3) hospitals can extend the provision of critical care using non-critical care personnel via a deliberate model of delegation to match staff competencies with patient needs.By using the Task Force suggestions for adequate supplies of medical equipment, appropriate treatment space, and trained staff, communities may better prepare to deliver augmented essential critical care in response to disasters.

2008 Chest

2811. Characteristics of medical surge capacity demand for sudden-impact disasters. (Abstract)

for characterization of the length of time before a U.S. community can expect arrival of outside assistance, the expected types of medical surge demands, the expected time for the peak in medical-care demand, and the expected health system access points.The earliest that outside assistance arrived for a community subject to a sudden-impact disaster was 24 hours, with a range from 24 to 96 hours. After sudden-impact disasters, 84% to 90% of health care demand was for conditions that were managed on an ambulatory (...) Characteristics of medical surge capacity demand for sudden-impact disasters. To describe the characteristics of the demand for medical care during sudden-impact disasters, focusing on local U.S. communities and the initial phases of sudden-impact disasters.Established databases and published reports were used as data sources. Data were obtained to describe the baseline capacity of the U.S. medical system. Information for the initial phases of a sudden-impact disaster was sought to allow

2006 Academic Emergency Medicine

2812. The measurement of daily surge and its relevance to disaster preparedness. (Abstract)

The measurement of daily surge and its relevance to disaster preparedness. This article reviews what is known about daily emergency department (ED) surge and ED surge capacity and illustrates its potential relevance during a catastrophic event. Daily ED surge is a sudden increase in the demand for ED services. There is no well-accepted, objective measure of daily ED surge. The authors propose that daily and catastrophic ED surge can be measured by the magnitude of the surge, as well (...) as by the nature and severity of the illnesses and injuries that patients present with during the surge. The magnitude of an ED surge can be measured by the patient arrival rate per hour. The nature and severity of the surge can be measured by the type (e.g., trauma vs. infection vs. biohazard) and acuity (e.g., triage level) of the surge. Surge capacity is defined as the extent to which a system can respond to a rapid and sizeable increase in the demand for resources. ED surge capacity includes multiple

2006 Academic Emergency Medicine

2813. The importance of evidence-based disaster planning. (Abstract)

disasters, compares them with research findings, and discusses the implications for planning. These assumptions are that: 1. Dispatchers will hear of the disaster and send emergency response units to the scene. 2. Trained emergency personnel will carry out field search and rescue. 3. Trained emergency medical services personnel will carry out triage, provide first aid or stabilizing medical care, and--if necessary--decontaminate casualties before patient transport. 4. Casualties will be transported (...) The importance of evidence-based disaster planning. Disaster planning is only as good as the assumptions on which it is based. However, some of these assumptions are derived from a conventional wisdom that is at variance with empirical field disaster research studies. Knowledge of disaster research findings might help planners avoid common disaster management pitfalls, thereby improving disaster response planning. To illustrate the point, this article examines several common assumptions about

2006 Annals of Emergency Medicine

2814. Implementation of an emergency and disaster medical response training network in the Commonwealth of Independent States. (Abstract)

training encourages uniform delivery of medical care within regions and may facilitate provision of mutual aid between regional jurisdictions. (...) Implementation of an emergency and disaster medical response training network in the Commonwealth of Independent States. A standardized curriculum in emergency and disaster medical response for use in the former Soviet Union was implemented under an American International Health Alliance partnership program involving over 60 healthcare and educational institutions in the United States and the Commonwealth of Independent States. The core curriculum was based on U.S. standards and developed

2005 Journal of Emergency Medicine

2815. School performance and social-emotional behavior of primary school children before and after a disaster. (Abstract)

on school performance in primary school children. This study also shows that teachers and youth health care practitioners especially should be aware of children starting school several years after a disaster. Although very young at the time of a disaster (1-4 years of age), they may experience disaster-related problems. (...) School performance and social-emotional behavior of primary school children before and after a disaster. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the cognitive and social-emotional consequences in a general population of primary school children affected by the firework disaster in Enschede, The Netherlands, on May 13, 2000. The explosions caused tremendous damage in the surrounding neighborhood. Twenty-two people immediately died and >1000 were injured.This retrospective study assessed school

2006 Pediatrics

2816. The pediatrician and disaster preparedness. Full Text available with Trip Pro

and treatments. Although children may respond more rapidly to therapeutic intervention, they are at the same time more susceptible to various agents and conditions and more likely to deteriorate if not monitored carefully. The challenge of dealing with the threat of terrorism, natural disasters, and public health emergencies in the United States is daunting not only for disaster planners but also for our medical system and health professionals of all types, including pediatricians. As part of the network (...) The pediatrician and disaster preparedness. Recent natural disasters and events of terrorism and war have heightened society's recognition of the need for emergency preparedness. In addition to the unique pediatric issues involved in general emergency preparedness, several additional issues related to terrorism preparedness must be considered, including the unique vulnerabilities of children to various agents as well as the limited availability of age- and weight-appropriate antidotes

2006 Pediatrics

2817. The pediatrician and disaster preparedness. Full Text available with Trip Pro

The pediatrician and disaster preparedness. For decades, emergency planning for natural disasters, public health emergencies, workplace accidents, and other calamities has been the responsibility of government agencies on all levels and certain nongovernment organizations such as the American Red Cross. In the case of terrorism, however, entirely new approaches to emergency planning are under development for a variety of reasons. Terrorism preparedness is a highly specific component of general (...) to deteriorate if they are not monitored carefully. This article is designed to provide an overview of key issues for the pediatrician with respect to disaster, terrorism, and public health emergency preparedness. It is not intended to be a complete compendium of didactic content but rather offers an approach to what pediatricians need to know and how pediatricians must lend their expertise to enhance preparedness in every community. To become fully and optimally prepared, pediatricians need to become

2006 Pediatrics

2818. Predictors of psychological distress in survivors of the 1999 earthquakes in Turkey: effects of relocation after the disaster. (Abstract)

Predictors of psychological distress in survivors of the 1999 earthquakes in Turkey: effects of relocation after the disaster. Relocations after disasters are known to cause added distress in survivors. This study examined the effects of migration and other factors on psychological status of survivors 4 years after the two severe earthquakes in Turkey.Five hundred and twenty-six adult survivors of the 1999 earthquakes currently living in Ankara were given self-report measures assessing (...) traumatic stress, depression, earthquake experience and social support.The rates of current post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression were 25% and 11%, respectively. Although both traumatic stress and depression factors were predicted by some demographic and trauma severity variables, relocation status predicted depression but not traumatic stress.The rates of psychological distress were higher than expected in a city considered to be safe in terms of earthquake risk. Relocation after

2006 Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica

2819. Smoking as a risk factor for mental health disturbances after a disaster: a prospective comparative study. (Abstract)

of the Netherlands. The surveys included measures of smoking (Dutch Local and National Public Health Monitor); severe anxiety, depression, and hostility symptoms (the Symptom Checklist-90, revised); and disaster-related post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD; DSM-IV criteria) (the PTSD self-rating scale).Victims who smoked at T1 had a higher chance to suffer from severe anxiety symptoms (adjusted OR = 2.32 [95% CI = 1.19 to 4.53]), severe hostility symptoms (adjusted OR = 1.84 [95% CI = 1.06 to 3.22 (...) Smoking as a risk factor for mental health disturbances after a disaster: a prospective comparative study. To assess whether smoking is a(n) (independent) risk factor for mental health problems among adult disaster victims and among a nonexposed comparison group.Surveys were conducted 18 months (T1) and 4 years (T2) after a fireworks disaster in Enschede, the Netherlands (May 13, 2000), among adult victims (N = 662) and a comparison group (N = 526) of residents of a city located in another part

2007 Journal of Clinical Psychiatry

2820. Acute stress disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, and depression in disaster or rescue workers. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Acute stress disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, and depression in disaster or rescue workers. The events of Sept. 11, 2001, highlighted the importance of understanding the effects of trauma on disaster workers. To better plan for the health care of disaster workers, this study examined acute stress disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), early dissociative symptoms, depression, and health care utilization in disaster workers.Exposed disaster workers (N=207) and unexposed (...) experience or who had acute stress disorder were more likely to develop PTSD. Similarly, those who were depressed at 7 months were 9.5 times more likely to have PTSD. Those who were depressed at 13 months were 7.96 times more likely to also meet PTSD criteria. More exposed disaster workers than comparison subjects obtained medical care for emotional problems at 2, 7, and 13 months. Overall, 40.5% of exposed disaster workers versus 20.4% of comparison subjects had acute stress disorder, depression at 13

2004 American Journal of Psychiatry

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