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Magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance arthrography and ultrasonography for assessing rotator cuff tears in people with shoulder pain for whom surgery is being considered

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 2011

Magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance arthrography and ultrasonography for assessing rotator cuff tears in people with shoulder pain for whom surgery is being considered - The Cochrane Library - Lenza - Wiley Online Library from Log In E-Mail Address Password Remember Me > > > > DATABASE TOOLS DATABASE MENU FIND ARTICLES OTHER RESOURCES Diagnostic Test Accuracy Review You have full text access to this content Magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance arthrography and ultrasonography for assessing rotator cuff tears in people with shoulder pain for whom surgery is being considered Mário Lenza 1,* , Rachelle Buchbinder 2 , Yemisi Takwoingi 3 , Renea V Johnston 2 , Nigel CA Hanchard 4 , Flávio Faloppa 1 Editorial Group: Published Online: 24 SEP 2013 Assessed as up-to-date: 22 AUG 2011 DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD009020.pub2 Copyright © 2013 The Cochrane Collaboration.
Magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance arthrography and ultrasonography for assessing rotator cuff tears in people with shoulder pain for whom surgery is being considered.
Disorders of the rotator cuff tendons due to wear or tear are among the most common causes of shoulder pain and disability.
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) and ultrasound (US) are increasingly being used to assess the presence and size of rotator cuff tears to assist in planning surgical treatment.
Objectives To compare the diagnostic test accuracy of MRI, MRA and US for detecting any rotator cuff tears (i.e.
partial or full thickness) in people with suspected rotator cuff tears for whom surgery is being considered.
We also searched trial registers, conference proceedings and reference lists of articles to identify additional studies.
Selection criteria We included all prospective diagnostic accuracy studies that assessed MRI, MRA or US against arthroscopy or open surgery as the reference standard, in people suspected of having a partial or full thickness rotator cuff tear.
We excluded studies that selected a healthy control group, or participants who had been previously diagnosed with other specific causes of shoulder pain such as osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis.
Studies with an excessively long period (a year or longer) between the index and reference tests were also excluded.
Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently extracted data on study characteristics and results of included studies, and performed quality assessment according to QUADAS criteria.