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Oral 14, Spontaneous atrophic scarring of the cheeks: atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis?

British Journal of Dermatology, 2007


Oral 14, Spontaneous atrophic scarring of the cheeks: atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis? , , , .
On examination, her skin was well hydrated with no eczematous change, no typical acneiform features and no evidence of keratosis pilaris.
Antinuclear antibody and porphyrin screens were negative and limited monochromator phototesting and photoprovocation testing was normal.
Differential diagnoses included scarring secondary to varicella, atrophoderma vermiculatum, hydroa vacciniforme and infantile acne but these were excluded by the chronic course, clinical findings and lack of seasonal variation.
Atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis is a rare condition with approximately 20 reports in the literature.
Typically, spontaneous macular atrophy is reported on the face in the absence of preceding trauma or inflammation but lesions have been described elsewhere on the body.
The lesions may be linear, punctate or rounded and some reports do describe initial erythema and scale.
Histological findings are variable and include epidermal thinning, a mild perivascular lymphocytic infiltrate, fragmented elastic fibres and normal or increased collagen.